Profile photo of Dr. Dongmei Cheng

Dr. Dongmei Cheng

Assistant Professor

Literature and Languages

Office Location: Hall of Languages 116

Email: dongmei.cheng@tamuc.edu



Research

Current Research Projects


1. Reading, Interpreting, and Creating Comics in the ESL/EFL Classroom (with Alberto Miras-Fernandez) 

This project is based on our workshop presentation in the video and digital media strand in the 2017 TESOL International Convention in Seattle, WA. We are currently working on a journal manuscript. In the meantime, we are gathering more information to add to our project Google site: https://sites.google.com/view/comicsinl2teaching/home

2. Speech Act Performance and Perceptions of Chinese EFL Speakers (with Yuecong Li, Meichan Huang, and Ruosi Wang)

The purpose of this research is to describe the characteristic of major speech acts (requests, apologies, and refusals) produced by Chinese EFL speakers and native speakers of American English as well as their self-perceptions of speech act performance.

Research Questions:

  1. How do Chinese EFL speakers perform major speech act functions in English? And how do the characteristics of their speech act performance differ from those of native speakers of American English?
  2. What are the speakers’ perceptions of their own speech act performance?

Research instruments: Open role-play & stimulated recall tasks

Future Research Agenda

1. An exploration of CALL tools in online graduate classes: e.g., video feedback via screencast recordings; e-portfolios

This is an action research project that I am planning to conduct with my online MA-TESOL students. Since I constantly use a variety of CALL tools in my online course instruction, I would like to explore the effectiveness of these tools and graduate students' perceptions of them. e.g., What do they like/dislike about the usage of these tools in their online classes? Are they going to adopt these tools in their own teaching, and if so, which one? How do the implementation of these CALL tools help them to succeed in their coursework and career preparations?

2. Audience perceptions of speech acts performed by Chinese EFLs and native speakers of American English

This is a follow-up project I plan to conduct after the project on speech act production and perceptions. The meaning of any speech act lies in audience's interpretation. Therefore, this project will target audience perceptions of the three types of speech acts performed by Chinese EFLs and native speakers of American English. An online survey will be designed and distributed to two types of audience, students and instructors, who will rate the overall effectiveness of the speech act performance of the students included in the survey.

3. Speech act performance in L1 and L2: A study of Chinese learners of English   

This project will test the bidirectional hypothesis (i.e., forward transfer & backward transfer) of language development in the area of pragmatics. Data will be gathered from native Chinese speakers, using the Chinese version of the same instruments as the ones in my previous research. The following research questions will be targeted:

a. To what extent do Chinese EFL learners’ L1 influence their speech act realizations in the L2?

b. Does their knowledge of the L2 might in turn influence their speech act behavior in the L1?

Publications

Book

Sun, J. & Cheng, D. (In Press). China’s Generation Gap. Routledge.

Peer-Reviewed Articles

Cheng, D. (2017). Communication is a two-way street: Instructors’ perceptions of student apologies. Pragmatics: Quarterly Publication of the International Pragmatics Association, 27 (1), 1-32.

Cheng, D. & Liang, J. (2015). The effect of instruction on Chinese EFL learners’ compliment responses. TESOL International Journal, 10 (2), 1-23.

Cheng, D. (2011). New insights on compliment responses: A comparison between native English speakers and Chinese L2 speakers. Journal of Pragmatics, 43 (8), 2204-2214.

Book Reviews

Cheng, D. (In Press). Book Review: Autonomous Language Learning with Technology by Chun Lai. CALICO Journal.

Cheng, D. (May 25, 2017). Book review: Pragmatic Issues in Specialized Communicative Contexts: Francesca Bianchi and Sara Gesuato (Eds.) LINGUIST List 28.2322. Retrieved from https://linguistlist.org/issues/28/28-2322.html.

Cheng, D. (2010). Book review: Investigating Pragmatics in Foreign Language Learning, Teaching, and Testing: Eva Alcón Soler and Alicia Martínez-Flor (Eds.) Journal of Pragmatics 42 (7), 2066-2068.

Presentations

Peer-reviewed international/national conferences:

Miras-Fernandez, A. & Cheng, D. (2017, March). Reading, interpreting, and creating comics in the ESL/EFL classroom. Paper presented at the TESOL 2017 International Convention, Seattle, WA.

Cheng, D. (2016, October). Using e-portfolios in a L2 writing teacher training course. Paper presented at the Symposium on Second Language Writing 2016 Annual Conference, Tempe, AZ.

Cheng, D. (2015, March). "Communication is a two-way street”: Instructors' Perceptions of Student Apologies. Paper accepted at the joint American Association

for Applied Linguistics and Association Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée 2015 Conference, Toronto, Canada.

Cheng, D. (2014, November). An exploration of teaching EAP writing in a content-based curriculum. Paper presented at the Symposium on Second Language Writing 2014 Annual Conference, Tempe, AZ.

Cheng, D. (2013, March). Student-instructor apologies: How are they produced and perceived? Paper presented at the American Association for Applied Linguistics 2013 Annual Conference, Dallas, TX.

Cheng, D. (2013, March). A Multi-pronged investigation of student-instructor apologies.  Paper presented at the TESOL 2013 International Convention, Dallas, TX.

Cheng, D. (2011, August). Compliment responses in naturalistic settings:  Native English speakers vs. Chinese L2 speakers. Paper presented at the 16th World Congress of Applied Linguistics, Beijing, China.

Cheng, D. (2011, March). Email apologies by American and ESL students: What do they do? Why do they do it? Paper presented at the American Association for Applied Linguistics 2010 Annual Conference, Chicago, IL.

Cheng, D. (2010, March). Effect of instruction on Chinese EFL learners’ compliment responses. Paper presented at the American Association for Applied Linguistics 2010 Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA.

Cheng, D. (2009, November). The effectiveness of corrective feedback on Chinese EFL writers’ grammatical accuracy improvement. Paper presented at 2009 Symposium on Second Language Writing, Tempe, AZ.

Zhang, C., & Cheng, D. (2009, March). Linguistic features associated with Chinese EFL learners’ argumentative writing. Paper presented at the American Association for Applied Linguistics 2009 Annual Conference, Denver, CO.

Other conferences:

Cheng, D. & Smith, T. (2017, October). Computer Assisted Learning with WordSift. Workshop prsented at TexTESOLV Fall Conference, Plano, TX.

Cheng, D. (2012, October). Institutional apologies: Why and how should they be taught? Paper presented at the 2012 annual AZ-TESOL Convention, Phoenix, AZ.

Cheng, D. (2010, February). Effect of instruction on Chinese EFL learners’ compliment responses. Paper presented at Peaks 2010 Conference, Flagstaff, AZ.

Cheng, D. (2009, March). Compliment responses between Chinese ESL and native speakers of American English. Poster presented at TESOL 2009 Doctoral Forum, Denver, CO.

Cheng, D. (2009, February).  Compliment responses between Chinese ESL and native speakers of American English. Paper presented at Peaks 2009 Conference, Flagstaff, AZ.

Cheng, D., Zhang, C., & Hua, Y. (2006, November). ESL curriculum for undergraduate exchange students. Poster presented at Minnesota TESOL Conference, Minneapolis, MN.

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